Dryhill Local Nature Reserve

Situated in the Kent Downs Area of outstanding natural beauty, Dryhill is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The exceptional structure of its rocks and fossils led to it becoming the first 'geological' Local Nature Reserve in Kent.

Originally a stone quarry, this closed in the 1950s and since then nature has reclaimed the site, creating woodlands that are ideal for picnics.

Woodland and high rocky outcrops are all linked with a variety of paths to explore, and there are two open picnic areas in grassland surrounded by trees.

The rocks at Dryhill are of great research and educational value as they allow geologists to understand the environmental conditions that existed during the Lower Cretaceous, an important part of our geological history. Exceptional rock formations exposed on the site called Hythe Beds are thought to have been deposited approximately 115 million years ago.

Dryhill is part of Regionally Important Geological Sites (RIGS), geological sites that are important for historical, scientific research or educational reasons. The Kent RIGS Group, English Nature and Local Authorities work together to protect and maintain them for these purposes.

Facilities

  • Groups welcome
  • Guide Dogs, Hearing Dogs and Registered Assistance Dogs welcome
  • Pets welcome